This Blue Creature Found In The Caribbean Sea Leaves Scientists Unanswered

DISCOVERY – Despite the many scientific explorations carried out there, the seabed is still full of mysteries. This is particularly the case with this blue creature discovered by the American ocean observation agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), during its exploration of the deep waters of the Caribbean. Specifically, this organism has been sighted off the southwest coast of Santa Cruz, US Virgin Islands. We encountered this unknown blue organism several times during the third edition of the Voyage to the Ridge 2022 expedition”, says NOAA.

For scientists, there are many hypotheses: it could be a soft coral, a sponge or even a tunicate. As you can see in our video, the organism in question has a sticky appearance, sometimes spherical, sometimes flattened on the ground. Filmed more than 400 meters deep in late August 2022, the creature appears to have no specific shape and lacks a face or limbs.

It’s definitely not from a rock! »

Since capturing these images, scientists have yet to identify the organism, but one thing is certain: it is alive and well. “It’s definitely not a rock!” », says NOAA in a tweet. Several similar living beings have already been identified in deep waters: the “Blue Smurf” and the “Sansibia Flave” are blue soft corals. Among the ocean sponges, Haliclona caeruleaa variety that lives in the Caribbean, is similar in some aspects to this unidentified creature — including its color.

Shipping “Journey to the Ridge 2022” consists of a series of dives “to collect baseline information on unexplored and poorly understood deep-sea areas of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Azores Shelf”, explains the NOAA. Scientists aim to map these marine areas.

Previous NOAA explorations have already yielded startling discoveries, such as starfish Plinthaster dentatus, which look like ravioli. The marine world has not finished surprising us!

NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Windows to the Deep 2019 Plinthaster dentatus, or the ravioli-shaped starfish.

NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Windows to the Deep 2019

Plinthaster dentatus, or the ravioli-shaped starfish.

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