Being cold at home could harm mental health

An English study, published in the journal “Science Direct”, reveals that a cold habitat is associated with an increased risk of developing serious mental distress.





By ThePoint.fr

Being cold at home can make you give up inviting people over and cause a form of social isolation that is harmful to mental health.
Being cold at home can make you give up inviting people over and cause a form of social isolation that is harmful to mental health.
© TOMASELLI Antoine / MAXPPP / PHOTOPQR/LA PROVENCE/MAXPPP

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Lhe news sends shivers down the spine as rising energy prices prompt us to limit heating. According to a British study published in the specialized journal ScienceDirect, involving nearly 100,000 individuals, living in a “cold” house would be associated with an increased risk of developing “serious mental distress”. Thus, the risk of developing serious mental distress would double in people living in a cold environment and who had no history of mental disorders before. Worse, this risk would triple in the event of a history.

The authors of this study put forward several reasons for this worrying observation. First of all, living in an environment with little or no heating can be a source of stress: fear of falling ill, risk related to humidity, stress of having to turn on the heating and therefore spend more money. “Not being able to comfortably heat your home and your family reduces the feeling of control over your environment,” the researchers also explain. Next, a poorly heated dwelling is in fact not “warm”, the occupants may therefore no longer want to invite people into their home and are then in the grip of isolation. Finally, being cold at home could affect the quality of your sleep by affecting restful sleep.

In addition, the study explains that some people are more vulnerable than others to the effects of the cold due to more time spent at home (elderly, stay-at-home parent) and/or greater difficulty manage their body temperature.

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If the study does not advance figures to qualify housing as “cold”, the ideal temperature of the living room is between 19 and 21 degrees. But according to the Environment and Energy Management Agency (Ademe), two-thirds of French people are cold at home when the heating is on, and this, generally, due to insulation problems. Therefore, solving the problem of energetic colanders seems all the more essential.


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